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Monthly Archives: March 2014

The Second Hardest Interview Question

The second hardest interview question is, “What is your greatest strength?” You certainly don’t want to present yourself as a boaster. (My greatest strength? Hmmm. Let’s see…uh…greatest strength, eh? I got a lot to choose from, so it’s hard to pick just one.)

The best answer to the second hardest interview question is, “I see what needs to be done and I just do it.” If you can say it with a straight face, you just might get the job.

Hope this helps,

Mr. B

*Even if it’s not your greatest strength, say it anyway.

 
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Posted by on March 24, 2014 in Teaching Tips

 

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The Hardest Interview Question

Spring is coming! (I hope.) And what that means in the world of education is that soon schools all across the land will be shuffling their line-ups as they anticipate next school year. Some teachers will be leaving in June because they qualify for social security, and they’re looking forward to sleeping in and playing golf a lot more than just the three months in the summer that they’re used to. Some will be leaving to pursue other interests, while a select few will be told to leave and never come back.

The point is that there will be some openings, and you just might find yourself sitting across the table from an administrator grilling you about your educational philosophies and classroom management strategies. However, the hardest interview question has nothing to do with either of these two topics. The hardest interview question quite simply is, “What’s your greatest weakness?” What makes it so hard to answer is that you can’t be totally honest. If you have a short temper, that’s really not something you want a potential employer to know. (Sometimes I get so mad I just lose it!) Or if you’re not overly ambitious. (I don’t like to work too hard, just enough to get by.)  

The best answer to the hardest interview question is, “I tend to over commit.” It’s the best answer because it’s not really a bad thing for the people you might be working for to hear. You could elaborate a little, but don’t get too carried away. For example, don’t say, “Sometimes I stretch myself a little too thin and get so wrapped up in what I’m doing I don’t take time for myself.” That’s being a tad bit pretentious and may even cause those sitting across the table to feel somewhat queasy.

Hope this helps,

Mr. B

 
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Posted by on March 5, 2014 in Teaching Tips

 

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